Posts Tagged doors

Press Release: BuildBlock ICFs Releases BuildBuck ICF Door & Window Bucking

BuildBuck ICF

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE BuildBlock ICFs Releases BuildBuck ICF Door & Window Bucking Oklahoma City, OK – BuildBlock Building Systems is excited to announce the release of BuildBuck ICF Door & Window Bucking. BuildBuck is the ideal insulating bucking solution for door and window openings in a BuildBlock ICF project. BuildBuck is the longest EPS ICF buck on the market at 52-inches (132mm) and is designed to create a 4040 (4-ft x 4-ft) rough opening without any cutting. This product is available in 11-inch and 13-inch widths for 6-inch and 8-inch BuildBlock, BuildLock, and 6-inch GlobalBlock products and will be available

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Asked & Answered: How Do I Design Door & Window Openings in an ICF Home?

Asked-&-Answered

Door & Window Openings in an ICF Home Generally, there is little difference in door and window placement in an ICF home when compared to standard wood-framed construction. The biggest thing to keep in mind are openings really close together or really close to corners. Since the supporting structure to the wall is the concrete inside the walls, you need to make sure there is enough in the right places to carry the weight of the rest of the structure. Door & window openings in an ICF home have two structural elements: post and lintel. The post is the support on either side

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Asked & Answered: Is there an advantage to using wood bucks for window/door openings versus V-buck?

Asked-&-Answered

The majority of heat loss in an ICF home comes through wall openings such as windows and doors. You want to ensure that you have maintained as much insulation as possible around your openings. We have recommended V-buck for a number of years, but sadly they are no longer in business. Disadvantages of wood window and door bucking Wood is an organic food source for mold, mildew, and other hazards. Wood is a potential food source for infestations such as termites. Wood will also decay over time and there is a potential for wood to react to the chemicals in concrete causing damage. During

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